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Displaying blog entries 1-3 of 3

What is a Buyer's Agent

by The Jana Caudill Team

This blog piggy-backs on the previous article, “Buyer Self-Representation.”  The answer to the question Can I represent myself? is Yes, but why would you?

That article naturally leads to the question of agency, and specifically for this article, buyer agency.  A buyer’s agent represents and has a fiduciary duty to the Crown Point, Hobart, and Dyer buyer in a Real Estate transaction.  That’s the simple answer.  The listing agent represents and has a fiduciary duty to the seller in a Real Estate transaction.  This way each side has their own representation.

Here’s where it gets a little sticky.  As the buyer, and to establish the agency relationship with a buyer agent you must have a contract with that agent stating explicitly that you and the agent have an agency agreement (Buyer Agency Agreement.)  Without this formal, signed agreement all Realtors default position in the transaction are to represent the best interests, and hold a fiduciary duty to the seller.

That’s right.  The default status of any and all agents participating in a Real Estate transaction is to have an agency relationship to the seller unless stated otherwise in writing.  It doesn’t matter that the agent took you through twenty homes last Sunday, or gave coloring books to your kids to keep them busy while you toured all those homes.  It doesn’t matter if they are your neighbor, your cousin, or belong to the same PTA board.  If you do not have an agency agreement, in writing, stating that the Realtor is working on your behalf and as your agent THEY ARE NOT YOUR AGENT.  They are just the Realtor who drove you to all those home showings.

Good Realtors want that agency agreement too.  Transactions close more smoothly when each side has someone watching out for their best interests.  Be sure to request a buyer agency agreement from your Realtor.

Troubleshooting the Hot Water Heater - Part 1

by The Jana Caudill Team

All of a sudden – or more likely the problem started small and got worse with time – you have an issue with your water heater.  There’s not enough hot water, or NO hot water.  Maybe your hot water smells a little funny or has a rust colored tinge to it.  Maybe you even have water on the floor of your Crown Point, Chesterton, or Dyer basement.

Ok, first things first.  BE SAFE.  This article is on troubleshooting water heater problems, and although I’ll suggest how to fix the issue, this is by no means a comprehensive step-by-step repair plan.  If at any point you become “a little iffy” around a troubled water heater call in a professional.  You may very well be an accomplished do-it-yourselfer, but accidents do happen, and more often than not they happen at home.  Now, if you’re one to dig a little deeper into the issue a little home safety review is in order.  If you have an electric water heater be sure to turn it off by cutting power at your circuit/fuse box.  For gas water heaters turn the burner setting to pilot.  Then, for all heaters turn off the water supply to the heater.  On to the diagnostics:

Rust colored water:  Either the sacrificial anode rod has deteriorated (by design) to the point of necessary replacement or there is corrosion inside the water tank.  Most often this can be fixed by replacing the old rod with a new magnesium anode rod.

Smell:  The rotten egg odor you have is a bacteria growing on the inside of the tank.  The bacteria is being kept alive by feeding off the hydrogen gas emitted by the corroding anode rod.  You’ll need to flush out the tank with hydrogen peroxide and probably also replace the old anode with a new magnesium anode.  If the problem persists you may have to replace the tank lining as well.

We’ll continue the diagnostic next blog with the issues of little and no hot water, and discuss leaking water collecting at the base of the heater.

Attic and Basement Storage

by The Jana Caudill Team

I was thinking about storage solutions for your Crown Point, Dyer, or Munster home.  I’m not talking about color coded, stackable bins, or any of that.  What I had on my mind was how to make effective use of underutilized space.  After the garage the two most likely candidates for family storage are the basement and the attic.  Here are a couple pros and cons for storage both above your head and below your feet, and a thought or two on how to do it right.

As a rule basements are cooler than the rest of the house, and by comparison with the attic, much more accessible.  Generally if a large item like a couch or an exercise machine can fit through the front door and into the house it can also fit down the stairwell and into the basement.  But accessibility can have its drawbacks as well.  Anything you store in the basement will be seen every time you venture down there, and if there’s enough stuff down there it can easily get cluttered.  Not such a great strategy if you also use the basement as a family common area.  Take into account children and pets, particularly cats.  Nosy fingers and paws can accidentally overturn Great Granny’s antique china, or disturb Great Grandpa’s military medals and ribbons.  So anything you store in the basement should be clearly labeled in secure boxes.  Plastic containers are good, especially if there’s even the most remote threat of flooding.  Another drawback of storage in the basement is the simple convenience, and by that I mean anytime you have extra space life generally expands to fill it, which can inadvertently steal away usable living space.  It’s often easier to “take it downstairs” and deal with clutter later than to properly dispose of expendable items right away.  Basement storage in itself is a great argument for a garage sale.  So if you’re going to use the basement consider one or more of those standing, folding screens to store (hide) you stuff behind and out of site.  And don’t forget the space under the stairs.  It’s great for hiding more than childhood monsters.

Attics are difficult to access, and their entry points are significantly narrower than the hallway downstairs.  However, attics are great out of the way, forgotten spaces in the house, and anything you are able to haul up a ladder can be easily put out of site and out of mind.  That means no nosy children or pets accidentally breaking priceless family keepsakes.  A word of caution though.  Attics are warm, and can get downright miserable during the summer.  Be careful not to store Grandpa’s old letterman jacket up there.  Painted leather, like the sleeves on many of those coats can sweat natural oils in the heat and ruin the finish.  So it’s safer to keep delicate materials and fabrics elsewhere if possible.  This includes old family reel to reel movies, video tapes, and music cassettes.  All of these can suffer in the heat.  Here’s the hot tip for using your attic for storage: install a folding ladder and some flooring for safety, and easier accessibility.

Displaying blog entries 1-3 of 3

Contact Information

Photo of The Jana Caudill Team Real Estate
The Jana Caudill Team
Redkey Realty Leaders
503 East Summit St., Suite 2
Crown Point IN 46307
219-661-1256
Fax: 219-663-5949